Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Bat or butterfly: which will you see?

Speak.  My beauty lies inside of me.

GIF-11

 

LUKE 2:7

There was no room for them in the inn.

 

 

 Notice the Beauty

 

 

Now seems like a great time to step out of ourselves and our busy lives for a moment here and there to notice the people around us and to express, not just consider expressing, that we see their beauty.

Shatter Me

ABC News interview with Lindsey Stirling: backstory on “Shatter Me” and a little on her struggle with depression and eating disorder.

 

Advertisements

The prison doors shut tight,

The only key: the Light.

 

 

GIF-3.gif

LUKE 1:26-30

And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favour with God.

Christ the babe was born for you.

 

Recently I had cause to ponder the self-appellation “prisoner of Jesus Christ” (Philemon 1:1).  I’ve struggled with this concept before.  Perhaps it is because none of us wants to be a prisoner of anything.  We want to be in complete control of our lives.  Of course, this doesn’t stop us from making ourselves prisoners of addictions, social expectation, political dogmas, materialism, fear, and any number of other things.  Perhaps it is because my understanding of Christ is that He makes us free, and I have a hard time calling myself freeman and prisoner in the same breath and by the same source.  Today I found this post on the Mormon Tabernacle Choir blog and it sparked a new thought.

We refer to the time people spend in prison as time spent “paying their debt to society.”  Therefore, a prisoner is one who is paying a debt for a broken law to some entity which has authority to see that the law is upheld.  There is also a sense that the prisoner is making recompense to a party that has suffered because of his or her choices.  Both of these applications fit our relationship to Jesus Christ.

I have had several loved ones spend time in jail.  Some have used that time well; others have not.  Those who have done well first had to accept responsibility for what they had done, humble themselves and accept that they were there because of their choices, and stop trying to find a way to circumvent the consequences of their actions.  Once they let go of their anger, defensiveness, excuse-making, self-pity, resentment they were able to learn and to make the experience one that benefitted themselves and others.  Those who would not let go of these things never moved beyond them.

This is a lesson for all of us because we are all prisoners.  The question is are we at the point where we are willing to experience the odd mix of pain, peace, and joy that comes when we truly begin paying our debt to Christ (a debt, incidentally, that can never really be repaid) or are we “on the outside,” unaware or unwilling to admit that we are still subjecting ourselves to jailers that have no power to open the prison doors for us.

 

Commencing a venture, no matter how small,

is to hover a moment between fly and fall.

Last year I fell.  Who knows what this year will bring?  At this moment, however, the view is grand.  I’m not limiting myself to Christmas this year, though that will play a significant part I imagine.  I’m leaving myself, and you, free to explore the fanciful, the thought-provoking, and, most importantly, things that bring a little light into the dark months of December.  Let’s celebrate!  Shall we begin?

 

 

GIF-1.gif

MATTHEW 1:18

Now the birth of Jesus Christ was on this wise.

EUOUAE

I found a post at Grammerly on the longest English words.   This one caught my attention because it was quirdly (quirky in a wordly way) and it has to do with music, medieval church music to be precise.  I have a thing for Gregorian Chant.

Euouae is six letters long, but all of the letters are vowels. It holds two Guinness World Records. It’s the longest English word composed exclusively of vowels, and it has the most consecutive vowels of any word.”  (Grammarly)

(Euouae at Wikipedia)

Silent Night

One of my favorite carols.  This version is visually beautiful, and the reverence with which it is performed was uniquely touching.  I felt, possibly more than ever before, how sacred that first night was, how truly blessed was that moment of respite before a lifetime of relentless work and turmoil.  Christ’s was a life spent on others, lived en route to an acknowledged death, unavoidable as all our deaths are, but unavoidably brutal as well. I wonder how often Mary looked back on the tenderly merciful memory of peace and joy, simplicity and safety, as she watched her son live the demanding life and die the ignominious death of His destiny.

Watch Domingo’s eyes as he sings.  Listen for the astonishing closing “Holy Night.”  What I heard was “Hallelujah” in a tone that showed angelic reverence for Christ and what He willingly undertook for us.